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Embedding Employability in Non-vocational Undergraduate Courses: A Reflection on Practice Across the Institute of Health and Society at the University of Worcester

Solowiej, Kazia and Tsvetanova, A. and Hartnett, J. and Muse, Kate (2017) Embedding Employability in Non-vocational Undergraduate Courses: A Reflection on Practice Across the Institute of Health and Society at the University of Worcester. Worcester Journal of Learning and Teaching (11). ISSN 2024-8032

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Abstract

Employability can be defined simply as the character or quality of being employable (Hillage & Pollard, 1998). For students, undertaking a higher education degree is largely framed in terms of becoming more employable (McCowan, 2015) and, as a result, preferring courses that enable them to develop transferrable knowledge and skills which will increase their competitiveness in the labour market (Gosling, 2009). The concept of employability therefore continues to be highly relevant in a higher education context, for both students in work and those seeking work (McQuaid & Lindsay, 2005). Indeed, universities have an important responsibility to ensure their undergraduate courses have relevance to the employment market (Pothigai Selvan, 2013). The range of skills students develop in higher education is diverse, depending on their course and experience of work during study. Critical thinking, problem solving, research and analytical skills, interpersonal awareness, communication, self-reflection, time management, team working, and autonomy are key examples of skills developed during university and are highly attractive to a wide range of employers (Reddy, Lantz & Hulme, 2013). Given the importance of employability to students and prospective employers alike, it is imperative that careful consideration is given as to how to effectively embed employability across undergraduate courses. In light of this, this article aims to explore the ways in which employability is currently integrated across non-vocational disciplines within the Institute of Health and Society at University of Worcester, with a focus on key examples of practice drawn from Applied Criminology, Applied Health and Social Sciences and Psychology.

Item Type: Article
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The full-text can be accessed via the Official URL.
Worcester Journal of Learning and Teaching (WJLT) is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal published by the University of Worcester to disseminate academic articles, project reports and personal perspectives about Learning and Teaching written by staff associated with the University and its partners.

Uncontrolled Keywords: employability, employment, work-based learning, vocational courses, non-vocational courses, student perspectives, students as academic partners, learning, teaching, Worcester Journal of Learning and Teaching
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > L Education (General)
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
Related URLs:
Copyright Info: Open Acces
Depositing User: Karol Kosinski
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2017 12:50
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2017 14:59
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5268

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