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Differentiation Strategies Relating to the Inclusion of a Student with a Severe Visual Impairment in Higher Education (Modern Foreign Languages)

Lewin-Jones, Jenny and Hodgson, Joe (2004) Differentiation Strategies Relating to the Inclusion of a Student with a Severe Visual Impairment in Higher Education (Modern Foreign Languages). British Journal of Visual Impairment, 22 (1). pp. 32-36. ISSN Print: 0264-6196 Online: 1744-5809

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Abstract

A teacher of modern foreign languages (MFL) and a teacher of the visually impaired working in a university college explore and examine the needs of a student with a severe visual impairment embarking upon a course in German. This article sets out to illustrate the needs of both the student and the teachers. It also reflects upon some of the problems facing teachers in higher education (HE) when meeting a severely visually impaired (VI) student for the first time. The resultant case study offers insight into the process required to maintain academic standards while fully including the student in the course.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: modern foreign language modules, students, visual impairment, Higher Education, inclusion
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
P Language and Literature > PD Germanic languages
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Humanities and Creative Arts
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Depositing User: Jenny Lewin-Jones
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2015 11:33
Last Modified: 24 Mar 2015 11:33
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/3643

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