University of Worcester Worcester Research and Publications
 
  USER PANEL:
  ABOUT THE COLLECTION:
  CONTACT DETAILS:

A Longitudinal Study of Declarative and Procedural Memory in Primary School Aged Children

Lum, J and Kidd, E and Davis, Sarah K and Conti-Ramsden, G (2010) A Longitudinal Study of Declarative and Procedural Memory in Primary School Aged Children. Australian Journal of Psychology, 62 (3). pp. 139-148. ISSN 1742-9536

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

This study examined the development of declarative and procedural memory longitudinally in primary school-aged children. At present, although there is a general consensus that age-related improvements during this period can be found for declarative memory, there are conflicting data on the developmental trajectory of the procedural memory system. At Time 1 children aged around 5½ years were presented with measures of declarative and procedural memory. The tasks were then administered 12 months later. Performance on the declarative memory task was found to improve at a faster rate in comparison to the procedural memory task. The findings of the study support the view that multiple memory systems reach functional maturity at different points in development

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

The electronic full-text cannot be supplied for this item. Please check availability with your local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Uncontrolled Keywords: declarative memory, memory development, procedural memory
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
Depositing User: Sarah Davis
Date Deposited: 29 Oct 2012 17:11
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2012 17:11
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1999

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item
 
     
Worcester Research and Publications is powered by EPrints 3 which is developed by the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. More information and software credits.