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‘It’s not particularly P.C., you know…’ Women coaches’ performing gender in strength and conditioning

Thomas, Gavin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4662-1588, Guinan, Jaime and Molnar, Gyozo ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1732-5672 (2021) ‘It’s not particularly P.C., you know…’ Women coaches’ performing gender in strength and conditioning. Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal. ISSN 1063-6161 (print) 1938-1581 (eISSN) (In Press)

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Abstract

Strength & conditioning (S&C) has become a chief part of athletes’ physiological preparation. Despite S&C’s growing presence across sports, women coaches have been generally marginalised and under-represented. This study explores female S&C coaches’ experiences and coping mechanisms in a male-dominated industry. In doing so, semi-structured interviews with 15 female S&C coaches were conducted. Main themes identified from interview data are: organisational politics, impression management, and humour. The findings suggest that women S&C coaches are often in subservient positions and have to adopt some of the traditional, male-generated sub-cultural practices to fit in. They carefully manage their coaching front stage to generate an impression that is expected and accepted in the given milieu. In their efforts to fit in, women often find themselves in a multiplicity of power matrices which involve a continuous negotiation of gender identity, internal politics and managing sexist banter.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

This is an Open Access article which has been published ahead of print at https://doi.org/10.1123/wspaj.2020-0049
A pdf file of this article is available to download from this WRaP record.

Uncontrolled Discrete Keywords: male hegemony, marginalisation, gender performance, sexist banter
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Divisions: College of Business, Psychology and Sport > School of Sport and Exercise Science
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Copyright Info: Open Access article
Depositing User: Gavin Thomas
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2021 09:40
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2021 10:46
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/10267

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