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The effect of recovery interval duration on maximal aerobic capacity following 6 weeks of sprint interval training (SIT) in a group of inactive individuals

Price, Megan and Thomas, Gavin ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4662-1588 (2019) The effect of recovery interval duration on maximal aerobic capacity following 6 weeks of sprint interval training (SIT) in a group of inactive individuals. In: British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) Student Conference 2019, 17th - 18th April 2019, University of Dundee and Abertay University, Dundee. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

High intensity interval training is a time efficient alternative to more traditional modes of cardiovascular training. The following study investigates the effect of recovery interval duration on maximal aerobic capacity following 6-weeks of sprint interval training (SIT) in a group of inactive individuals. The study recruited 14 (female, n = 8) healthy sedentary individuals (i.e. mL·kg·min-1. The participants were randomly allocated into two groups; Group 1 (three 10-minute sessions per week) (male, n = 3; female, n = 3; 23 ± 4 years; 1.7 ± 0.1 m; 74 ± 7 kg) or group 2 (Six 5-minute sessions per week) (male, n = 3; female, n = 5; 22.9 ± 5.2 years; 1.7 ± 0.1m; 70 ± 12 kg). Both groups completed the same period of - 3 = 15 seconds and 20 seconds for the remaining 3 weeks). Group 1 repeated the protocol immediately, whereas group 2 underwent a minimum of 4 hours rest before completing the protocol again. Training was completed three days a week. Maximal aerobic capacity ( O2peak) was determined before and 3-days after the exercise program via a cycling ramp test to exhaustion. Prior to the intervention, maximal aerobic capacity and power was 36 ± 5 mL·kg·min-1 and 213 ± 19 W for group 1, and 38 ± 8 mL·kg·min-1 and 216 ± 58 W for group 2. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and affect (feeling scale) was also measured on selected training sessions. All measures were analysed with a paired samples t-test using Graph Pad Prism 8 with significance accepted at P < 0.05. Both groups presented significant changes in O2peak (Group 1 39 ± 6 mL·kg·min-1; 10 ± 8%; P = 0.0253) (Group 2 41 ± 7 mL·kg·min-1; 9 ± 8%; P = 0.0095). However, there was no difference reported between conditions (P = 0.9483). In conclusion, three 10-minute sessions per week of sprint interval cycling improve maximal aerobic capacity to the same extent as six 5-minute sessions per week.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Additional Information:

The peer reviewed abstract of this poster presentation is available at https://www2.worc.ac.uk/gjseper/documents/abstracts.pdf (S1)

Uncontrolled Keywords: high intensity interval training, recovery interval duration, maximal aerobic capacity, sprint interval training, inactive individuals
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: Divisions (2019 onwards) > College of Business, Psychology and Sport > School of Sport and Exercise Science
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Gavin Thomas
Date Deposited: 18 Oct 2019 12:41
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2019 12:41
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/8785

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