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Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy For Preventing Relapse in Recurrent Depression: A Randomized Dismantling Trial.

Williams, J.M.G., Crane, C., Barnhofer, T., Brennan, K., Duggan, D., Fennell, M.J.V., Hackmann, A., Krusche, A., Muse, Kate, Rudolf von Rohr, I., Shah, D., Crane, R.S., Eames, C., Jones, M., Radford, S., Silverton, S., Sun, Y., Weatherley-Jones, E., Whitaker, C.J., Russell, D. and Russell, I.T. (2014) Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy For Preventing Relapse in Recurrent Depression: A Randomized Dismantling Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 82 (2). pp. 275-286. ISSN Print: 0022-006X Online: 1939-2117

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Abstract

Objective: We compared mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) with both cognitive psycholog-ical education (CPE) and treatment as usual (TAU) in preventing relapse to major depressive disorder (MDD) in people currently in remission following at least 3 previous episodes. Method: A randomized controlled trial in which 274 participants were allocated in the ratio 2:2:1 to MBCT plus TAU, CPE plus TAU, and TAU alone, and data were analyzed for the 255 (93%; MBCT 99, CPE 103, TAU 53) retained to follow-up. MBCT was delivered in accordance with its published manual, modified to address suicidal cognitions; CPE was modeled on MBCT, but without training in meditation. Both treatments were delivered through 8 weekly classes. Results: Allocated treatment had no significant effect on risk of relapse to MDD over 12 months follow-up, hazard ratio for MBCT vs. CPE 0.88, 95% CI [0.58, 1.35]; for MBCT vs. TAU 0.69, 95% CI [0.42, 1.12]. However, severity of childhood trauma affected relapse, hazard ratio for increase of 1 standard deviation 1.26 (95% CI [1.05, 1.50]), and significantly interacted with allocated treatment. Among participants above median severity, the hazard ratio was 0.61, 95% CI [0.34, 1.09], for MBCT vs. CPE, and 0.43, 95% CI [0.22, 0.87], for MBCT vs. TAU. For those below median severity, there were no such differences between treatment groups. Conclusion: MBCT provided significant protection against relapse for participants with increased vulnerability due to history of childhood trauma, but showed no significant advantage in comparison to an active control treatment and usual care over the whole group of patients with recurrent depression.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: childhood trauma, major depression, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, relapse prevention, suicidality
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
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Depositing User: Kate Muse
Date Deposited: 19 Aug 2014 10:26
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2015 12:18
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/3321

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