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On the Relationship Between Time Management and Time Estimation

Francis-Smythe, Jan (1999) On the Relationship Between Time Management and Time Estimation. The British Journal of Psychology, 90 (3). pp. 333-347. ISSN 0007-1269

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Abstract

The study explores the relationship between people's self-report of the use of time management practices and estimates of task duration. The hypothesis is that those who are good time managers will be good at estimating how long a future task will take (expected), how long a previously executed task has taken (retrospective) and how long a task is taking while in process (prospective). In the expected setting results indicate that those who perceive themselves as good time managers are most accurate at estimating the duration of a future task, of those who do not perceive themselves as good time managers some grossly overestimate and many underestimate to quite a considerable extent. The latter finding thus provides support for the 'planning fallacy' (Kahneman & Tversky,1979). In the prospective setting results indicate those who perceive themselves as good time managers tend to underestimate time passing. It is suggested that this is a motivational strategy designed to enhance a sense of control over time. Findings are discussed in relation to existing theories of time estimation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

The original article is available at www.ingentaconnect.com

Uncontrolled Keywords: time management, time managers, planning, duration estimation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Academic Departments > Worcester Business School
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jan Francis-Smythe
Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2008 09:17
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2010 05:00
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/276

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