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Principles and Practical Grouping for the Use of Drill and Practice Programs

Jackson, A and Kutnick, P and Kington, A (2001) Principles and Practical Grouping for the Use of Drill and Practice Programs. Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning, 17 (2). pp. 130-141.

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Abstract

A previous paper showed that young children performed better when working as individuals rather than in pairs on a drill and practice program. This paper reports an analysis of behaviour and talk for individuals and single sex pairs using a computer-based drill and practice activity to explain differences in performance. Results indicated that individuals were more likely to be task-focused and to complete tasks successfully than children working in pairs. Differences were found in off-task activity, behaviours and type of talk. Grouping and verbal interaction are discussed in relation to the type of task/program that children are asked to undertake, and how both task and peer presence may constrain the child's task focus and performance when reinforcing pre-existing knowledge.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: discourse analysis, drill and practice, practice, group, individual, primary, process
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Education
Depositing User: Alison Kington
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2012 09:38
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2012 09:38
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1907

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