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A Systematic Review of the Drive for Muscularity Research Area

Edwards, Christian and Tod, D and Molnar, Gyozo (2012) A Systematic Review of the Drive for Muscularity Research Area. In: Annual British Psychological Society conference, April 2012, London, UK . (Submitted)

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Abstract

The purpose of the current paper was to perform a systematic review of 52 studies in which the drive for muscularity (DFM) has been measured. Variables most consistently related to DFM are (a) gender, with males reporting higher levels than females (b), anxiety and body shame, (c) perceptions that the ideal physique involves high muscularity, (d) behaviours associated with increasing muscularity, including dietary manipulation and resistance training, and (e) the internalization of a muscular physique as the standard to which to aspire. The DFM was inconsistently correlated with self-esteem, physical characteristics, and actual-ideal discrepancies. Research has focused on white male students and been cross sectional and descriptive. Further theory-driven work is needed with a wider range of populations to enhance the conceptualization, measurement, and understanding of the DFM.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
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Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Sport and Exercise Science
Depositing User: Christian Edwards
Date Deposited: 28 Sep 2012 10:58
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2012 12:49
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1700

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