University of Worcester Worcester Research and Publications
 
  USER PANEL:
  ABOUT THE COLLECTION:
  CONTACT DETAILS:

Physiotherapist Survey: Increasing Thoracic Spine Movement Within the Management of Chronic Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

Meadows, S., Smith, Gordon and Vaswani, R. (2019) Physiotherapist Survey: Increasing Thoracic Spine Movement Within the Management of Chronic Subacromial Impingement Syndrome. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. ISSN 1360-8592 (In Press)

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

Aims This study’s primary aim is to address two questions. Firstly; what evidence exists regarding the inclusion of increasing thoracic movement within the management of SIS?; and secondly, what proportion of Society of Musculoskeletal Medicine (SOMM) physiotherapists use this form of treatment within SIS management? Methods An online survey was conducted using a questionnaire incorporating a vignette describing a patient with chronic SIS. The SOMM physiotherapy members were sampled using convenience sampling. Findings This study has identified some evidence supporting increasing movement of the thoracic spine in the management of patients with SIS. No study or guideline protocols have been identified that advocate the use of this form of treatment, nor research identified that investigates physiotherapists’ use of this form of treatment within SIS management. Of the 1340 physiotherapists surveyed, 52 responded of which 79 stated that they would use treatment aimed at increasing movement of the thoracic spine within SIS management. Chi Square analysis suggests no significant association between using this treatment and number of years experience (p value = 0.15) or courses attended (p = 0.62). Conclusions Evidence suggests it is beneficial to include treatment to increase thoracic spine mobility within SIS management. This study highlights the need for the clinician to be aware of the role of the thoracic spine in relation to the biomechanics of the shoulder complex. Of the sample of SOMM physiotherapists obtained, the majority stated that they would use this form of treatment. Further research is recommended.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

Staff and students at the University of Worcester have access to the full-text of the unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication via the UW online Library Search. External users should check availability with their local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Uncontrolled Keywords: thoracic spine, dorsal spine, kyphosis, subacromial impingement syndrome, subacromial bursitis, shoulder impingement, physiotherapist, physical therapist
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
R Medicine > RZ Other systems of medicine
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Gordon Smith
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2019 13:02
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2019 13:02
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/8343

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item
 
     
Worcester Research and Publications is powered by EPrints 3 which is developed by the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. More information and software credits.