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Females Exposed to 24 Hours of Sleep Deprivation Do Not Experience Greater Physiological Strain, But Do Perceive Heat Illness Symptoms More Severely, During Exercise-heat Stress

Relf, R., Willmott, A., Mee, Jessica A., Gibson, Oliver, Saunders, Arron, Hayes, Mark and Maxwell, Neil S (2018) Females Exposed to 24 Hours of Sleep Deprivation Do Not Experience Greater Physiological Strain, But Do Perceive Heat Illness Symptoms More Severely, During Exercise-heat Stress. Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 (3). pp. 348-355. ISSN Print: 0264-0414 Online: 1466-447X

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Abstract

Purpose: There is limited and inconclusive evidence surrounding the physiological and perceptual responses to heat stress while sleep deprived, especially for females. This study aimed to quantify the effect of 24-hrs sleep deprivation on physiological strain and perceptual markers of heat-related illness in females. Method: Nine females completed two 30 min heat stress tests (HST) separated by 48 hrs in 39°C, 41% relative humidity at a metabolic heat production of 10 W.kg-1. The non-sleep deprived HST was followed by the sleep deprivation (SDHST) trial for all participants, during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Physiological and perceptual measures were recorded at 5 min intervals during the HSTs. On the cessation of the HSTs, heat illness symptom index (HISI) was completed. Results: HISI scores increased after sleep deprivation by 28±16 vs. 20±16 (P=0.01). Peak (39.40±0.35°C vs. 39.35±0.33°C) and change in rectal temperature (1.91±0.21 vs. 1.93±0.34°C), and whole body sweat rate (1.08±0.31 vs. 1.15±0.36 L.h-1) did not differ (P>0.05) between tests. No difference was observed in peak, nor rise in; heart rate, mean skin temperature, perceived exertion or thermal sensation during the HSTs. Conclusion: 24 hrs sleep deprivation increased perceptual symptoms associated with heat related illness, however, no thermoregulatory alterations were observed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of Sports Sciences on 24 Mar 2017, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2017.1306652.

Staff and students at the University of Worcester can access the full-text of the published version via the UW online library search. External users should check availability with their local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Uncontrolled Keywords: metabolic heat production, thermoregulation, sleep loss, heat injury, females
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Sport and Exercise Science
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Jessica Mee
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2019 09:16
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2019 09:18
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/8140

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