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A Prospective Research Study to Investigate the Impact of Complementary Therapies on Patient Well-being in Palliative Care

Nyatanga, Brian and Cook, Deborah and Goddard, A. (2018) A Prospective Research Study to Investigate the Impact of Complementary Therapies on Patient Well-being in Palliative Care. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 31. pp. 118-125. ISSN 1744-3881 Online: 1873-6947

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Abstract

Complementary therapies are being used more in the UK over the last two decades and yet very little evidence of their benefit is available. The aim of this study was to investigate, through face to face interviews with patients, using a phenomenlogical approach the perceived benefits of the different therapies in terms of their overall patient well-being. Eight patients; mean age 52.87 years, range 40-64 years presenting in the palliative care phase for life limiting conditions comprising one male and seven females agreed to participate in the study between March and September 2015. All eight participants reported perceived benefited from the therapies and that their identified concerns had been ameliorated. Participants reported feeling relaxed, calmer and being able to carry on with their daily lives and refocussing on themselves and what is important in life. Complementary therapies played a positive role, and therefore, an acceptable model of supporting palliative care patients.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: complementary therapy, patient well-being, palliative care, end-of-life care, concerns
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
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Depositing User: Brian Nyatanga
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2018 09:50
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2018 10:58
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/6402

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