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Dyslexia in General Practice Education: Considerations for Recognition and Support

Shrewsbury, Duncan (2016) Dyslexia in General Practice Education: Considerations for Recognition and Support. Education for Primary Care, 27 (4). pp. 267-270. ISSN 1473-9879 Online: 1475-990X

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Abstract

Dyslexia is a common developmental learning difficulty, which persists throughout life. It is likely that those working in primary care will know, or even work with someone who has dyslexia. Dyslexia can impact on performance in postgraduate training and exams. The stereotypical characteristics of dyslexia, such as literacy difficulties, are often not obvious in adult learners. Instead, recognition requires a holistic approach to evaluating personal strengths and difficulties, in the context of a supportive relationship. Strategies to support dyslexic learners should consider recommendations made in formal diagnostic reports, and aim to address self-awareness and coping skills.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: dyslexia, specific learning difficulties, postgraduate medical training, general practice education, learner support
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
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Depositing User: Duncan Shrewsbury
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2017 13:09
Last Modified: 11 Jul 2017 08:18
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5636

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