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Response to: ‘Don’t Let Kids Play Football’: a Killer Idea

Bullingham, Rachael and White, A. and Batten, J. (2017) Response to: ‘Don’t Let Kids Play Football’: a Killer Idea. British Journal of Sports Medicine. ISSN 0306-3674 Online: 1473-0480 (In Press)

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Abstract

In a recent BJSM editorial, it was stated that ‘shutting down youth sports programmes’ is not the answer to injury concerns in contact sport; suggesting there may be unintended consequences, such as increasing sedentary behaviour.1 With physical inactivity a leading cause of mortality, concerns about decreasing participation in physical activity are justified. This issue has even been discussed in a previous editorial in the BJSM.2 There is no evidence, however, to suggest that collision sports (specifically) are necessary to combat sedentary lifestyles of youth. There also continues to be a distinct misunderstanding of what has been called for in regards to the banning of tackling in school rugby, which will now be clarified.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: sports programmes, injury concerns, sedentary behaviour, response to ‘Don’t Let Kids Play Football’ editorial
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Sport and Exercise Science
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Depositing User: Rachael Bullingham
Date Deposited: 28 Apr 2017 11:21
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2017 12:43
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5471

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