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Quantum Performance: Scientific Discourse in the Analysis of the Work of Contemporary British Theatre Practitioners

Johnson, Paul (2006) Quantum Performance: Scientific Discourse in the Analysis of the Work of Contemporary British Theatre Practitioners. PhD thesis, Coventry University in collaboration with University of Worcester.

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Abstract

The scientific developments made during the twentieth century have provoked a profound re-conceptualisation of the nature of reality. Quantum mechanics in particular has produced a spectacular paradigm shift, the philosophical implications of which are still being debated and explored. This thesis explores these implications in terms of developing a framework for the analysis of live performance through three conceptual categories: identity, observation and play. Though there has been some recent theatre work, notably Copenhagen and Hapgood, that engage explicitly with quantum mechanics in terms of form and content, these performances are not the focus of this study, rather the scientific material is used to engage with a range of performance practice.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
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Uncontrolled Keywords: quantum mechanics, science, British, theatre, theater, drama, performance, women, directors, directing
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Humanities and Creative Arts
Depositing User: Deborah Offen
Date Deposited: 14 Mar 2008 14:23
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2014 10:01
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/353

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