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Blood Glucose Self-monitoring in Non-insulin-treated type 2 Diabetes: a Qualitative Study of Patients' Perspectives

Peel, Elizabeth and Parry, O. and Douglas, M. and Lawton, J. (2004) Blood Glucose Self-monitoring in Non-insulin-treated type 2 Diabetes: a Qualitative Study of Patients' Perspectives. British Journal of General Practice, 54 (500). pp. 183-188. ISSN 0960-1643

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Self-monitoring of blood glucose is controversial in the management of type 2 diabetes. Some research suggests that self-monitoring improves glycaemic control, whereas other research is sceptical about its value for people with type 2 diabetes who are not on insulin. Although blood glucose meters are widely available and used by this group, patients' own views are absent from the debate. AIM: To explore the pros and cons of glucose monitoring from the patients' perspectives. DESIGN OF STUDY: Qualitative repeat-interview study. SETTING: Patients were recruited from 16 general practices and three hospital clinics within four local healthcare cooperatives in Lothian, Scotland. METHOD: Interview data from 40 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the previous 6 months were analysed using thematic analysis informed by grounded theory. We report findings from round 1 and round 2 interviews. RESULTS: Glucose monitoring can heighten patients' awareness of the impact of lifestyle; for example, dietary choices, on blood glucose levels. Glucose monitoring amplifies a sense of 'success' or 'failure' about self-management, often resulting in anxiety and self-blame if glucose readings remain consistently high. Moreover, monitoring can negatively effect patients' self-management when readings are counter-intuitive. CONCLUSION: Our analysis highlights the importance of understanding the meanings that newly diagnosed patients attach to glucose self-monitoring. To maximise the positive effects of self-monitoring, health professionals should ensure that patients understand the purpose of monitoring and should clarify with patients how readings should be interpreted.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: blood glucose, blood glucose self-monitoring, glucose testing, patient education, qualitative study, type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycaemic control, blood glucose meters, patients' perspectives
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
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Depositing User: Elizabeth Peel
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2013 16:41
Last Modified: 22 Mar 2016 17:24
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/2595

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