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Reproductive Success of the Rare Endemic Orchis galilaea (Orchidaceae) in Lebanon.

Machaka-Houri, N. and Al-Zein, M.S. and Westbury, Duncan and Talhouk, S.N. (2012) Reproductive Success of the Rare Endemic Orchis galilaea (Orchidaceae) in Lebanon. Turkish Journal of Botany, 36 (6). pp. 677-682. ISSN Print: 1300-008X Online: 1303-6106

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Abstract

The biology and ecology of Orchis galilaea Schltr., a species endemic to Lebanon, Palestine, and Jordan, is poorly studied, a fact that hinders present and future management and conservation efforts concerning this species. In this paper, we report findings of a field investigation that assessed the impact of altitude, population density, and plant size on the reproductive success of O. galilaea. The results revealed that plant size and population density were significantly correlated with reproductive success while altitude was not. This study is part of ongoing research on the ecological responses of O. galilaea and provides a baseline for understanding the conservation potentials for this rare endemic species.

Item Type: Article
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The full-text of this article can be accessed via the Official URL

Uncontrolled Keywords: altitude, population density, plant size, fruit set, deceptive pollination, conservation
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Science and the Environment
Copyright Info: Open Access article
Depositing User: Janet Davidson
Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2013 12:29
Last Modified: 20 May 2015 10:39
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/2297

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