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Evaluation of the Efficacy and Economics of Irrigation Management, Plant Resistance and Brassicaspot™ Models for Management of White Blister on Brassica Crops

Minchinton, E.J. and Auer, D.P.F. and Thomson, F.M. and Trapnell, L.N. and Petkowski, J.E. and Galea, V. and Faggian, R. and Kita, N. and Murdoch, C. and Kennedy, Roy (2012) Evaluation of the Efficacy and Economics of Irrigation Management, Plant Resistance and Brassicaspot™ Models for Management of White Blister on Brassica Crops. Australasian Plant Pathology, Decemb. ISSN Print: 0815-3191 Online:1448-6032

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Abstract

Options for the integrated management of white blister (caused by Albugo candida) of Brassica crops include the use of well timed overhead irrigation, resistant cultivars, programs of weekly fungicide sprays or strategic fungicide applications based on the disease risk prediction model, Brassicaspot™. Initial systematic surveys of radish producers near Melbourne, Victoria, indicated that crops irrigated overhead in the morning (0800–1200 h) had a lower incidence of white blister than those irrigated overhead in the evening (2000–2400 h). A field trial was conducted from July to November 2008 on a broccoli crop located west of Melbourne to determine the efficacy and economics of different practices used for white blister control, modifying irrigation timing, growing a resistant cultivar and timing spray applications based on Brassicaspot™. Growing the resistant cultivar, ‘Tyson’, instead of the susceptible cultivar, ‘Ironman’, reduced disease incidence on broccoli heads by 99 %. Overhead irrigation at 0400 h instead of 2000 h reduced disease incidence by 58 %. A weekly spray program or a spray regime based on either of two versions of the Brassicaspot™ model provided similar disease control and reduced disease incidence by 72 to 83 %. However, use of the Brassicaspot™ models greatly reduced the number of sprays required for control from 14 to one or two. An economic analysis showed that growing the more resistant cultivar increased farm profit per ha by 12 %, choosing morning irrigation by 3 % and using the disease risk predictive models compared with weekly sprays by 15 %. The disease risk predictive models were 4 % more profitable than the unsprayed control.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: Brassicaspot™ White blister, radish, broccoli, integrated disease management
Subjects: S Agriculture > SB Plant culture
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Science and the Environment
Depositing User: Sally Wall
Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2012 13:54
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2014 14:17
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/2116

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