University of Worcester Worcester Research and Publications
 
  USER PANEL:
  ABOUT THE COLLECTION:
  CONTACT DETAILS:

The Restoration of Phytophagous Beetles in Species-Rich Chalk Grasslands

Woodcock, B.A. and Edwards, A.R. and Lawson, C.S. and Westbury, D.B. and Brook, A.J. and Harris, S.J. and Masters, G and Booth, R and Brown, V.K. and Mortimer, S.R. (2010) The Restoration of Phytophagous Beetles in Species-Rich Chalk Grasslands. Restoration Ecology, 18 (5). pp. 638-644. ISSN Print:1061-2971 Online:1526-100X

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

This study focuses on the restoration of chalk grasslands over a 6-year period and tests the efficacy of two management practices, hay spreading and soil disturbance, in promoting this process for phytophagous beetles. Restoration success for the beetles, measured as similarity to target species–rich chalk grassland, was not found to be influenced by either management practice. In contrast, restoration success for the plants did increase in response to hay spreading management. Although the presence of suitable host plants was considered to dictate the earliest point at which phytophagous beetles could successfully colonized, few beetle species colonized as soon as their host plants became established. Morphological characteristics and feeding habits of 27 phytophagous beetle species were therefore tested to identify factors that limited their colonization and persistence. The lag time between host plant establishment and colonization was greatest for flightless beetles. Beetles with foliage-feeding larvae both colonized at slower rates than seed-, stem-, or root-feeding species and persisted within the swards for shorter periods. Although the use of hay spreading may benefit plant communities during chalk grassland restoration, it did not directly benefit phytophagous beetles. Without techniques for overcoming colonization limitation for invertebrate taxa, short-term success of restoration may be limited to the plants only.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

The electronic full-text cannot be supplied for this item. Please check availability with your local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Uncontrolled Keywords: calcareous grassland, coleoptera, colonization, hay spreading, hay strewing, persistence, soil disturbance
Subjects: S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Q Science > QH Natural history
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Science and the Environment
Depositing User: Janet Davidson
Date Deposited: 23 May 2011 15:52
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2012 14:59
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1343

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item
 
     
Worcester Research and Publications is powered by EPrints 3 which is developed by the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. More information and software credits.