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Physical Education and Sport in Hungarian Schools After the Political Transition of the 1990's.

Hamar, P and Peters, D.M. and Van Berlo, Karen and Hardman, Ken (2006) Physical Education and Sport in Hungarian Schools After the Political Transition of the 1990's. Kinesiology: International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology, 38 (1). pp. 86-93. ISSN 1331-1441

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Abstract

Across central and eastern Europe, countries entered into a political transition period typified by democratic freedom and idealism and in educational reforms by conceptual reorientations based on ideas of humanism and liberalisation. This article focuses on school physical education and sport in Hungary after the political transition period of the 1990s. Specifically, it highlights issues relating to curriculum changes, the conceptual modernisation of school physical education and sport, the emergence of a Hungarian national curriculum and suggests that schools and physical education practitioners have critical roles in promoting and fostering participation in physical and sporting activity through curricular and extracurricular programmes for essential full lifespan engagement.

Item Type: Article
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The electronic full-text for this item can be accessed via the Official URL.

Uncontrolled Keywords: educational reforms, curriculum changes, school sport, Hungary
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2361 Curriculum
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Sport and Exercise Science
Depositing User: Janet Davidson
Date Deposited: 05 Nov 2010 13:42
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2012 05:00
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1042

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