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Social Workers, Service Users and Austerity – A Common Cause

Shennan, G. and Unwin, Peter (2017) Social Workers, Service Users and Austerity – A Common Cause. Professional Social Work. pp. 22-23. ISSN 1352-3112

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Abstract

In January 2016, the International Federation of Social Workers hosted a Solidarity Symposium on social work and austerity, which BASW members attended along with a number of European colleagues. A statement was agreed, which said: “Austerity is a flawed economic theory that increases debt burden, unemployment, homelessness, inequality and causes misery upon the lives of citizens.” Social workers know how short-sighted cuts to preventive services are, as they can put intolerable pressure on people who then end up needing far more expensive provision. Reclaiming advocacy as an essential social work role is needed for our service user and carer voices to be heard inside as well as outside our agencies. As well as giving a voice to service users and carers we work with individually, we can form alliances on an organisational level to combat the effects of austerity on the most vulnerable in our society.

Item Type: Article
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A version of this article can be found at http://www.boot-out-austerity.co.uk/blog/blog_read.php?pid=1

Uncontrolled Keywords: austerity, service users, carers, social work
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
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Depositing User: Peter Unwin
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2017 14:18
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2017 14:18
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5587

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