University of Worcester Worcester Research and Publications
 
  USER PANEL:
  ABOUT THE COLLECTION:
  CONTACT DETAILS:

Interface of the Environment and Occurrence of Botrytis cinerea in Pre-symptomatic Tomato Crops

Wakeham, Alison and Langton, A and Adams, S. and Kennedy, R. (2016) Interface of the Environment and Occurrence of Botrytis cinerea in Pre-symptomatic Tomato Crops. Crop Protection, 90. pp. 27-33. ISSN 0261-2194

[img]
Preview
Text
Botrytis Crop Protection 2016 submission (1).pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (686kB) | Preview

Abstract

Botrytis cinerea (Grey mould) is a necrotrophic fungus infecting over 230 plant species worldwide. It can cause major pre- and post-harvest diseases of many agronomic and horticultural crops. Botrytis cinerea causes annual economic losses of 10–100 billion US dollars worldwide and instability in the food supply (Jin and Wu, 2015). Grey mould losses, either at the farm gate or later in the food chain, could be reduced with improved knowledge of inoculum availability during production. In this paper, we report on the ability to monitor Botrytis spore concentration in glasshouse tomato production ahead of symptom development on plants. Using a light weight and portable air sampler (microtitre immunospore trap) it was possible to quantify inoculum availability within hours. Also, this study investigated the spatial aspect of the pathogen with an increase of B. cinerea concentration in bio-aerosols collected in the lower part of the glasshouse (0.5 m) and adjacent to the trained stems of the tomato plants. No obvious relationship was observed between B. cinerea concentration and the internal glasshouse environmental parameters of temperature and relative humidity. However the occurrence of higher outside wind speeds did increase the prevalence of B. cinerea conidia in the cropping environment of a vented glasshouse. Knowledge of inoculum availability at time periods when the environmental risk of pathogen infection is high should improve the targeted use and effectiveness of control inputs.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

Staff and students at the University of Worcester can access the full-text of the published version via the UW online library search. External users should check availability with their local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Uncontrolled Keywords: bio-aerosol, immunoassay, disease, environment, integrated disease management
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Science and the Environment
Related URLs:
Copyright Info: Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License
Depositing User: Janet Davidson
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2016 13:52
Last Modified: 27 Aug 2017 01:00
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/4907

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item
 
     
Worcester Research and Publications is powered by EPrints 3 which is developed by the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. More information and software credits.