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It has had quite a lot of reverberations through the family": reconfiguring relationships through parent with dementia care

Peel, Elizabeth (2016) It has had quite a lot of reverberations through the family": reconfiguring relationships through parent with dementia care. In: Revaluing Care in Theory, Law & Policy: Cycles and Connections. Social Justice . Routledge, London, pp. 198-214. ISBN Hardback: 978-1-13-894319-3

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Abstract

In this chapter I explore the accounts of adult children caring for a parent with dementia. Dementia is typically understood to be an umbrella term for a large number of conditions, the most common of which are Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and fronto-temporal dementia. These are progressive – ultimately terminal – conditions that affect memory, communication, mood and behaviour. I examine the accounts of interactions with parents with dementia that fracture and reconfigure normative familial relationships. In so doing I suggest that, in the absence of a primary spousal carer, caring for a person living with dementia can necessitate particular issues for adult children that trouble notions of how we understand familial roles, responsibilities and ‘duties’.

Item Type: Book Section
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Uncontrolled Keywords: parents, dementia, carers
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Health and Society
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Depositing User: Elizabeth Peel
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2015 13:49
Last Modified: 11 May 2017 10:11
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/3991

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