University of Worcester Worcester Research and Publications
 
  USER PANEL:
  ABOUT THE COLLECTION:
  CONTACT DETAILS:

Novel `Crowdsourcing` Methods Will Have Global Impact.

Walton, Nigel (2014) Novel `Crowdsourcing` Methods Will Have Global Impact. The Oxford Analytica Daily Brief.

[img] Text
F__Oxford Analytica - Daily Brief - Crowdsourced Forecasting.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (177kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

The methods used by organisations to forecast the future have changed very little over the last sixty years whilst the speed of change and the level of volatility in the external environment has increased inexorably to hitherto unseen proportions. However, one of the causes of this volatility, Internet technology, may be responsible for providing a solution to the problems of forecasting in highly complex and fast moving macro and micro environments. Crowdsourcing has recently emerged as a credible forecasting technique where information is obtained by enlisting the services of a wide range of different people via the Internet and using this expertise to make future predictions relating to macroeconomic and geopolitical events.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information:

Staff and students at the University of Worcester have access to the full-text. External users should check availability with their local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Uncontrolled Keywords: crowdsourcing, communications, technology, internet, industry, economy, forecasting
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HB Economic Theory
H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
T Technology > T Technology (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Worcester Business School
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Nigel Walton
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2014 09:57
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2014 09:57
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/3440

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item
 
     
Worcester Research and Publications is powered by EPrints 3 which is developed by the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. More information and software credits.