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Drive for Muscularity and Social Physique Anxiety Mediate the Perceived Ideal Physique Muscle Dysmorphia Relationship.

Thomas, A., Tod, D., Edwards, Christian and McGuigan, M.R. (2014) Drive for Muscularity and Social Physique Anxiety Mediate the Perceived Ideal Physique Muscle Dysmorphia Relationship. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 28 (12). pp. 3508-3514. ISSN Print: 1064-8011 Online: 1533-4287

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Abstract

This study examined the mediating role of drive for muscularity and social physique anxiety in the perceived muscular male ideal physique and muscle dysmorphia relationship in weight training males. Males (N = 146, Mean +/- SD; age 22.8 +/- 5.0 years; weight 82.0 +/- 11.1 kgs; height 1.80 +/- 6.8 m; BMI 25.1 +/- 3.0) who participated in weight training completed validated questionnaires measuring drive for muscularity, social physique anxiety, perceived muscular male ideal physique, global muscle dysmorphia, and several characteristics of muscle dysmorphia (exercise dependence, diet manipulation, concerns about size/symmetry, physique protection behavior, and supplementation). Perceived ideal physique was an independent predictor of muscle dysmorphia measures except physique protection (coefficients = .113-.149, p < .05). Perceived ideal physique also predicted muscle dysmorphia characteristics (except physique protection and diet) via the indirect drive for muscularity pathway (coefficients = .055-.116, p < .05). Perceived ideal physique also predicted size/symmetry concerns and physique protection via the indirect drive for muscularity and social physique anxiety pathway (coefficients = .080-.025, p < .05). These results extend current research by providing insights into the way correlates of muscle dysmorphia interact to predict the condition. The results also highlight signals (e.g., anxiety about muscularity) that strength and conditioning coaches can use to identify at risk people who may benefit from being referred for psychological assistance.

Item Type: Article
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Article published ahead of print.

Uncontrolled Keywords: male body image, appearance, weight training
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Sport and Exercise Science
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Depositing User: Christian Edwards
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2014 07:43
Last Modified: 02 Apr 2015 13:27
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/3339

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