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Controversial Issues: Identifying the Concerns and Priorities of Student Teachers

Woolley, Richard (2011) Controversial Issues: Identifying the Concerns and Priorities of Student Teachers. Policy Futures in Education, 9 (2). pp. 280-291. ISSN 1478-2103

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Abstract

The theoretical framework of this article considers the significant place of education in the socialisation and enculturation of children. This requires that student teachers develop critical pedagogies as a means of promoting equity, pupil voice and democratic structures in schools. Key to this is Cole’s concept of ‘isms’ and ‘phobias’, and the need to prepare student teachers to address them, and to evaluate both formal and hidden curricula. This article outlines the findings of a small-scale study that explored student teachers’ views on elements of issues-based education, the content of their training courses, and their personal priorities and apprehensions. It involved student teachers in eight universities in England during 2008‑09. This article outlines the full range of responses to the survey and students’ reasons for their priorities. The findings provide a context for providers of initial teacher education to consider the content and focus of their programmes.

Item Type: Article
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Uncontrolled Keywords: education, children, student teachers
Subjects: L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Education
Depositing User: Richard Woolley
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2012 11:10
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2012 11:10
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1680

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