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Territory: The Claiming of Space

Storey, David (2001) Territory: The Claiming of Space. Insights into Human Geography . Pearson, Harlow. ISBN 0582327903

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Abstract

Territory provides a comprehensive introduction to theories of territoriality and the geographical outcomes of territorial control. It explores both macro-scale territoriality (e.g. the emergence of nations and state formation) and micro-scale territoriality (e.g. the 'designation' of particular spaces in urban areas or domestic contexts). Politics and political relationships underpin the world we live in. From a geographical perspective, the most obvious manifestation of this is the division of the Earth's surface into political units (states and sub-state divisions). There are also less explicit forms of territorial division which occur in more micro-scale contexts. Whether explicit or implicit, control over territory is a key political motivating force. Competing territory claims are a major source of conflict. The processes of control and the contestation over particular territory are thus key elements in what is known as political geography.

Item Type: Book
Additional Information:

A copy of this title is held at The Hive. External users should check availability with their local library or Interlibrary Requests Service.

Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Divisions: Academic Departments > Institute of Science and the Environment
Depositing User: David Storey
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2007 13:58
Last Modified: 06 Jul 2012 12:31
URI: https://eprints.worc.ac.uk/id/eprint/123

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